• “I want to come to Ottawa this summer and fly around over the town and county,” J.A. Woodlief, Ottawa’s aviator, said this morning at the Santa Fe Depot. Mr. Woodlief spends each summer with aeroplanes. He began two years ago and now is on his way to St. Louis to purchase a Benoist aeroplane. He will travel over the country this summer with his machine, giving individual exhibitions. Arch Woodlief, as he generally is known, is a son of the late Capt. William H. Woodlief of this county.

• Mrs. Minnie Elliott has brought suit in district court to break the will, supposed to have been left by her father, the late William Marks Sr., who died under rather mysterious circumstances Sept. 17, 1912, at his home in Greenwood Townships. Mrs. Elliott alleges that her brother, William Marks, used nefarious methods in securing the control of the senior Mark’s property after his death.

• The annual report of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture shows that Kansas had 114 acres of tobacco in 1912. This acreage yielded 113,300 pounds, valued at $11,330. Leavenworth County produced almost one half of that amount. Twenty one of the 105 Kansas counties are shown with a tobacco yield. Franklin County is not one of them. Cotton is another southern product in which Kansas plays a small part. There were 61 acres of cotton in the state last year. This gave a yield of 9.260 pounds, which was valued at $926. Stevens County raised 4,000 pounds of this.

• DAYTON, Ohio — No one can tell the number of dead claimed by the terrific storm that swept away the levees of this city. The estimates run from 200 to 5,000 dead, with more than 30,000 homeless.

• OMAHA, Neb. — Two hundred are known dead and 2,179 homeless after a devastating tornado.