• Lawrence will be among the first places to be visited by President-Elect Woodrow Wilson after the election, and one of his first speeches will be made here next month. The president elect is to be one of the principal speakers at the annual meeting of the National Social Center Association, which will be in session in Lawrence for three days in December.

• The charities of the coming winter were formally taken into consideration when the Associated Charities met yesterday afternoon in City Hall. The ladies decided to request the superintendent and the teachers of the city schools ask the children to bring Thanksgiving donations of clothing and eatables for the city’s poor.

• The Zellner Clothing Company now will be known as the Zellner-Pleasant Clothing company after Ralph Pleasant buys into the business. Pleasant has been in charge of the firm’s local business since Zellner moved to Louisville a few years ago to make his home. Pleasant came here from Lyndon and began work in the store that was then under the name of Smith & Zellner. He has worked up from the bottom of the business to the top and has made many friends for the store and many permanent customers for the firm during his work. Since 1870, there has been a clothing store at the southeast corner of Second and Main streets. It was first under the name of Ring & Smith, then Smith & Zellner and next the Zellner Clothing Company. Zellner’s connection with the store covers 30 years in which time he has helped build up one of the most substantial clothing trades in Kansas. Zellner has three other Kansas clothing stores.

• The old brick smokestack, which has stood guard over the old Santa Fe shops in Ottawa since 1872, is to be torn down. A gang of men under A. Baker, Chanute, began this morning to raze the old chimney, which had become so weakened that it was not safe.

• C.F. Lamb of this city has decided to devote his entire time to the management of the Ottawa Planing Mill on North Walnut street. This factory is a new one for Ottawa and was built and is conducted by local capital. It is a great improvement for the city, and the men who own it constructed it as a paying business and to add another factory to Ottawa’s list of enterprises.

• WASHINGTON — A man claiming to be Jesse Dowdell of Silverwood, Ind., who insisted on seeing the president, “to get him to lower the cost of living,” was taken into custody at the White House today.

• There seems to be no very good reason why Ottawa should not have a new road to Highland Cemetery just as it put in one to Hope Cemetery.

• Ottawa University is to take on its rival Baker University tomorrow in football. Rivalry is intense between Ottawa and Baker, and both teams can be relied upon to fight to the last ditch for victory. Baker has defeated Ottawa twice and secured one tie game since the two schools renewed football relations in 1909, when the game was re-established in the Methodist institution, and Ottawa is doubly anxious to wipe out the disgrace of these games.

• CINCINNATI, Ohio — Miss Myrtle Hays, a popular society girl and suffragette of Addyston, a suburb intensely interested in the re-election of President Taft, paid an election wager by rolling a peanut through the city’s leading throughfare with her nose while a brass band paraded ahead, playing “When Teddy Came Marching Home.” It took her a trifle less than three hours to roll the peanut three squares. The plucky young suffragette was heartily applauded. Clay McFarland, a Roosevelt enthusiast, was to perform the same stunt if the rough rider ran third.

• Because the people of Oregon voted last week against the abolition of capital punishment in that state, five men will be hanged within a few minutes of each other Friday, Dec. 13. After having postponed the execution of the sentences for several weeks in order to allow the people to express their will regarding capital punishment, Gov. Oswald West announced today that he would delay no further.