• Earnest E. Bohl was convicted of taking Mrs. Edna Gibbons to Fort Scott for immoral purposes. Bohl had been confident that he would be acquitted. He did not go on the witness stand in his own behalf, and his attorney, W.S. Jenks, called no witnesses for the defense.

• The district courtroom had every appearance of a barroom this morning with whiskey glasses, a case containing bottles, small bottles and different containers scattered on the floor. All of the wet goods comprised evidence in the case against John or “Jack” McCormick and his wife, Alice McCormick. They were arrested several days ago on a charge of maintaining a house of nuisance where persons have been permitted to congregate and drink.

• The attendance at the fair this year promises to aggregate the largest attendance any fair has shown. And this, in spite of the fact that in some sections of the county the report has been started to the effect that the single admission at the gates would be raised this year in order to help out the association financially. Such is not the case. The admission will be 25 cents as usual, and the season tickets are selling for 75 cents, the lowest priced fair in Kansas and one that is giving the most for the money.

• LOS ANGELES — For the second time within three years, a bomb jeopardized the life of Gen. Harrison Gray Otis, owner of the Los Angeles Times newspaper plant, which was destroyed by dynamite, Oct. 1, 1910.

• J.N. Harrison, better known to his many Ottawa and Franklin County friends as “Curley,” is a very popular man in Chattanooga now. He is commander of the Kansas department of the G.A.R. (Grand Army of the Republic) and is there with the Kansas staff and many Kansas veterans who are attending the Chattanooga reunion. But Mr. Harrison’s chief popularity now is shown by the fact that he is considered a likely man for the office of commander-in-chief to succeed Gen. Alfred B. Beers.

• A shipment of hollow tile or terra cotta re-enforcements for the concrete work in the new Dobson building, Third and Main streets, arrived today. The tile will be used in the concrete floors and will make them much lighter. This form of building material is used extensively in the East. A. Thurtle, one of the builders of the Dobson building, was in Chicago about 10 days ago and arranged for the tile to be used here. The concrete foundations are being completed rapidly.

• Don’t sell or give away cigarettes or cigarette papers to a minor. If you are in business, don’t sell them or keep them for free distribution to any one. If you are a minor, don’t smoke cigarettes on the streets, in parks or public places. These are the regulations provided in a new ordinance introduced for the first time before the city commission this morning.

• A new automobile and motorcycle ordinance was read for the first time this morning. It will prohibit any person under 14 years old from driving an automobile or motorcycle. It set the speed limit at 12 mph over street crossings. Lights are to be burning at any time from one half hour after sunset until one half hour before sunrise.

• The first-class “scrap” of the college year took place on Rock Creek last night, when a quiet chicken fry given by the second year academy class in honor of the first-year students was interrupted by the members of the third- and fourth-year classes. After a lively “scrap” lasting for half an hour, the upperclassmen were victorious, and the revelers were security tied. The dome painting indulged in annually by the freshman and sophomore classes was stopped last week by President S.E. Price and the only other relic of barbarism which is yet to be indulged in this year at the college is the freshman-sophomore chicken fry and “scrap,” which is expected to occur soon.