The Kansas Supreme Court on Friday overturned, in part, decisions made by a lower court and the Court of Appeals to change the sentence of convicted murderer James Lee Jamerson.

Jamerson, convicted of murder, aggravated robbery and other crimes as a teenager in the early 2000s in Shawnee County, appealed in 2015 what he and his attorney claimed was an incorrect sentencing on the murder charge. At the time, Shawnee County District Court Judge Evelyn Z. Wilson found that Jamerson's original sentencing was wrong, court documents said.

"To correct the error, Jamerson and the State both recommended that the second-degree murder sentence be reduced from 253 months to 176 months," the court said in the Friday decision.

However, Wilson determined another sentencing error also occurred, on the charges of aggravated robbery and conspiracy to commit aggravated robbery. The court ultimately determined, in what the Friday filing called "an apparent effort to keep the new sentence as close as possible to the one in 2001," all three sentences to run consecutive for a total controlling sentence of 279 months' imprisonment, nearly what the original sentence had been.

In challenging that decision, Jamerson and attorney Joseph A. Desch argued against that sentencing, taking the case before a Court of Appeals panel. The panel agreed with them, determining Wilson didn't have the authority to correct the unchallenged aggravated robbery and conspiracy sentences and lowered Jamerson's sentence to 221 months.

The state appealed the case to the Supreme Court, which on Friday upheld and overturned portions of both the district court and Court of Appeals decisions.

The result is that Jamerson's case has been reversed and remanded for resentencing. The original 35-month sentence for aggravated robbery was to be reinstated, and Jamerson's sentence was reduced from its original 288 months to 253 months.

Jamerson was in the news in 2016 after the State of Kansas kept him in solitary confinement for more than 1,000 days. The result was a Kansas Supreme Court at the time issued a landmark decision that Kansas judges must consider an inmate’s duration in solitary confinement when determining whether the inmate’s rights have been infringed upon.