WASHINGTON — There are political moments, and this might be one, in which worse is better. Moments, that is, when a society's per capita quantity of conspicuous stupidity is so high and public manners are so low that a critical mass of people are jolted into saying "enough, already." Looking on the bright side, as usually he is sensibly disinclined to do, Jonathan Rauch thinks such a moment might be arriving.

Writing in National Affairs Rauch, a Brookings Institution senior fellow, postulates a vast emptiness at the core of the politics that has engulfed us: "What if, to some significant extent, the increase in partisanship is not really about anything?"

This is plausible. The angriest conservatives, or at least people brandishing this label, show no interest in what was, until recently, conservatism's substance — limited government, balanced budgets, free trade, curbs in executive power, entitlement reform, collective security.

Rauch's thesis is that increased polarization has little to do with ideas and much to do with hostile feelings — "negative partisanship" — about others. "It's not so much that we like our own party," Rauch surmises, "as that we detest the other." The left, like the right, has no plausible, meaning implementable, plan for solving pressing problems, from immigration to $1 trillion deficits at full employment. Despising President Trump, who makes this easy, is a substitute for a politics of substance.

Rauch says "humans were designed for life in small, homogeneous groups where change was slow and choices were few." If he is correct, both left and right, like scorpions in a bottle, are in diametrically opposed but symbiotic reactions against modernity — against an open society "founded on compromise, toleration, and impersonal rules and institutions."

All this began before Trump slouched onto the political stage, and because of his electoral success he already has emulators among his despisers. Consider Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren's grotesque ascription of blame to unpopular others for everyone else's personal complaints — which she says government can remedy: "You've got things that are broken in your life? I'll tell you exactly why. It's because giant corporations, billionaires have seized our government."

Rauch believes that although political parties are instruments of partisan mobilization, it is their weakness that feeds today's polarization by smoothing the way for demagogues. As loyalty to parties' organizations and doctrines is supplanted by parties as hostility-based tribes, polarization supplies solidarity in an era of empty politics.

Rauch hopes that America's current public awfulness might "end up strengthening liberal norms and institutions by scaring us, at last, into defending them." Isn't it pretty to think so?

George Will's email address is georgewill@washpost.com.